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Posts tagged ‘ISO’

Review of camera – on my new Galaxy S III Mini

As even the most casual readers of this blog know by now, I do a lot of work as a photographer and thus take my art very seriously. So as a general rule, while I would never really advocate a cell phone camera over a fully functional DSLR, bridge camera or even a quality compact unit, the fact remains that sometimes these are simply more convenient.

With that being the case, I decided to give a quick review of the camera from my new phone the Samsung Galaxy S 3 Mini.

Photography:

The official manufacturer’s specifications - 

5 MP, 2592×1944 pixels, autofocus, LED flash, Geo-tagging, touch focus, face and smile detection, panorama

Real world usage (my opinion) - 

The camera offers a fair amount of adjustable features for a phone. This includes modes for shooting at night, facial feature enhancement and the ability to add a bit of sound to the beginning of your photo. While the jury is still out on these modes, the sports mode leaves a lot to be desired. But then again, that is typically the case on most cameras or devices. The flash is pretty good and very similar to any standard camera flash. You can easily adjust the flash setting as well. In addition to the auto focus mode, you can also opt to use macro focus which might come in handy with close-ups. The ISO can be set between 100 and 400 and it also provides the ability to adjust white balance on a basic level.

Video:

The official manufacturer’s specifications - 720p@30fps with secondary VGA

Real world usage (my opinion) - 

The standard video quality isn’t bad and the camera’s microphone captures the audio well. However, it is possible that it might be a bit too well as that does pick up a bit of background noise. They video files come out in MP4 format. As of this time, I haven’t been able to determine whether or not the video can be adjusted to be full-screen or not. Video can be shot in both a front and rear facing manner.

Samsung Galaxy S3 Mini

Camera phones will never replace real cameras

With the ever growing prevalence of camera phones

and the constant technical advancements that have come along with these devices, just about anyone and everyone has the means to take photographs on a regular basis. However, just because you have the ability to do something, doesn’t mean you have the skill or creative vision for it. Nor does it mean that your equipment can handle what actually has to be done in order to create true art.

This brings me to one of my major pet peeves as a landscape and portrait photographer – attempting to substitute a a camera phone for the real thing.

For example, one of the newest things out there is a Nokia Lumia 1020 which claims to have a 41 megapixel digital camera. While I have my doubts about the reality of this claim, even if it is true, that’s only a small part of the equation of what makes a quality camera.

A REAL decent camera must have all of these qualities if not more:

Ability to adjust aperture manually

Ability to adjust shutter speed manually

Ability to adjust ISO manually

Ability to adjust white balance manually

Ability to house an external flash

Ability to work with strobe lighting units

Ability to use and exchange multiple lenses 

Don’t get me wrong, camera phones are OK for just playing around or using in a pinch. But none of them can compare to the real thing.

Three tips for working with photography in low-light conditions

Whether you are a professional, advanced armature or just a photography enthusiast, chances are that we’ve all been there – working to make the best shot we can in low-light conditions. It’s no secret that this can be highly challenging and frequently frustrating.   And while there are many things that one might do to help to improve his or her photography in these less than perfect conditions, here are three basic suggestions that may help on their own or at least get you going in the right direction.

low light bridge above water

Use a low F-stop

In low-light conditions you should probably ALWAYS set your aperture to the lowest possible (or close) F number that you can. This will maximize the like that comes in. This has very few drawbacks except for the fact that it can possibly hurt the crispness and detail in the background. In fact, this is one of the simplest things to do to create an intentionally blurred background effect.

Set you camera to a high ISO

Depending upon the type and model camera you use, you may have more or less flexibility here. The lowest ISO options are typical 100 or 200 which can be used in well-lit locations. However, when you increase that number in your settings to say, 400, 800,l 1600, 3200 or more, you increase the camera’s sensitivity to the light that is available to you. The danger here is that the more you move up the scale, the more likely your image will be to have undesirable noise. So, you should be sure to see how your own camera handles increases in ISO as well as take the time to look into getting some form of noise reduction tool.

Try a slower shutter speed

The longer your shutter remains open, the more light that reaches your camera’s sensor. So, opening your shutter for a longer period or time can offset some of the problems with poor lighting. The challenge here is that the slower the shutter speed, the more chance for blur from any moving (even slightly) objects. This can also result form your own minor movements while holding the camera. That being the case, it is recommended that when you slow down the shutter, you should probably use a tripod to stabilize your camera and keep it from moving.

One last bonus tip…

In the event that you don’t already know this, it is a good idea to avoid using the on-camera flash whenever possible. This is because it only has a range of about 6 feet or so and thus is irrelevant for anything in the distance and it also tends to generate harsh light and shadows.

Good luck!

How’d the photographer do that?

Have you ever had a photo capture your eye

and then wonder how the photographer accomplished the effect within that piece of art? For a lot of us, this happens fairly frequently. And if you’re really interested in finding out how that particular image came together, what do you do?

In this digital age, it’s quite possible that your first instinct is to turn to Google or whatever else may be your preferred search engine. However, in many cases, you may not be able to find what you need with a simple “how to” style search. Even if you do get results, there’s a good chance you’ll end up finding some conflicting information. No need to worry though, there is a much easier way to figure out what a you’ll have to do in order to get the qualities you love into images you shoot on your own.

Perhaps you’ve heard of Flickr. For those of you who haven’t, it’s a photo storage and sharing tool with a bit of a social networking quality as well. The site has undergone some awesome visual upgrades lately but one of its coolest features still remains. That would be the ability to see the technical details of each image. With this information, it should be pretty easy to recreate an image similar to those you admire so much.

You’ll be able to tell exactly what shutter speed, aperture, ISO and more is the combination that produces the desired result. All you have to do is go out and find an image (on the site) that you want to emulate and go from there. Sure, some photographers may not like the fact that you can access this info. But the way I see it, it’s like sharing with and learning from other professionals and not really any different than when someone posts a Photoshop tutorial on Youtube. And besides, photographers essentially OK this when they decide to sign up of the site in the first place.

Check out the video I have created below to find out how to access this information for yourself. In this case, I used a model photography shot that I took myself but it works the same for every image throughout the entire site.

Low light photography

One of the most difficult aspects of working with photography can be dealing with the problem of low lighting and poorly lit shooting locations. Sure some expensive equipment can help but even that doesn’t guarantee success in bad lighting.

So, what can a photographer do to help to avoid the frustration that comes with this common problem? Here are a few things that might help.

low lighting for photography

1. Adjust your shutter speed

Setting your camera shutter to remain open for a longer time period allows more light to reach your sensor and thus a brighter overall outcome. Of course, when doing so you have to be careful to avoid unwanted blur. A tripod can be just the key.

2. Increase your ISO

By increasing your sensitivity, you have the chance to allow more light in and can minimize the need to set your shutter to an excessively long speed. The drawback here is that some cameras struggle with noise issues more than others. And depending upon your model, increasing the ISO can cause unwanted noise.

3, Use your flash

While in general, I avoid using a flash, especially the on-board one built into a camera, it can help to brighten up a dark location. The negative with this approach is that it can result in some over exposed parts of the images and harsh shadowing.

All in all, using these methods carefully may present some other challenges but can surely help to improve shots taken under less than ideal lighting conditions.

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