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Posts tagged ‘writing’

Alone (A Poem)

Compulsions and fear

Please leave me along

Knock on someone else’s door

And pretend that I’m not home

 

On second thought

Please do not

Don’t burden someone else

But flee from here altogether, away from every house

 

This is the newest piece by Jason Greiner, the author of two poetry books and more.

Reflections on a year gone by

Now that 2013 in nearing its end

(it’s 9:37 pm as I write this), I’d like to take a moment to reflect back on the past 12 months.

Quite honestly, this year has been far from the best for me and my family. There have been a lot of struggles, pain and heartache. And while I am always looking forward to the fresh start a new year brings, that is especially so this year.

Despite the negatives,  there have been some bright spots among the darkness. And many of those came in the form of arts.

So, without further ado, I would like to thank, acknowledge and recognize the following, all of which have had a great, positive impact on the year that was.

The models

To all the amazing models with whom I had the pleasure of working and creating some amazing art, thank you so much and I hope to work with you more in 2014.

Web design and Social Media clients

To all those in need of social media management or content creation and the development or revision of websites, I thank you for allowing me the opportunity as well as the challenge.

Fiverr buyers

To everyone on Fiverr who ordered one or more of my “gigs” allowing me to delve into a variety of artistic projects ranging from photo editing to custom limericks. It’s been great and I look forward to working with you guys even more this year.

The muses

To anyone or anything that inspired me over the course of the year to seek out that perfect photo, write that ideal line of poetry or otherwise create the best pieces of art that I could, you have been so amazing and I am truly grateful.

Photography caption contest week four

We have now tcome to the last round of the Creative Dreamer’s four-week photography caption competition. Winner from the last three weeks have already been notified and are all in the running to win the top prize of thier choice as well as the prizes for single week winnings.

Now let’s get down to the final round.

Reminder of the rules – leave your most creative caption idea, limited to one word only, as a comment on this post for a chance to win a weekly as well as overall prize. For all details on the contest please click the link above.

Week four photo:

caption contest photo

Photography caption contest week three

For the second week in a row, cate b. has won our four-week photography caption competition. As the winner, once our contest is concluded, she’ll earn her choice of prizes for each of the first two weeks.

Now let’s get down to round three.

Reminder of the rules – leave your most creative caption idea, limited to one word only, as a comment on this post for a chance to win a weekly as well as overall prize. For all details on the contest please click the link above.

Week three photo:

country shed

Good luck!

Photography caption contest winner and round two

The first winner of the four-week photography contest is cate b. Congrats on your win!

So without further ado, let’s get to the next round.

Once again, the rules are that you leave your most creative caption idea, limited to one word only, as a comment on this post for a chance to win a weekly as well as overall prize. If you need a refresher on all the details, please see the link above.

Week two photo:

photography contest

Top Ten Things Your English Teacher Got Wrong

Many of the things we learn in school or in another educational setting we tend to instantly accept as fact. But no matter how reasonable something might seem, that doesn’t necessarily mean that it’s true. This is certainly the case when it comes to some of the “rules” that govern the English language as you may heave been taught to understand them. From the simplest notions of proper grammar to the more complex idea of citing sources in research documents, chances are you have been taught to abide by several of these so-called facts that are either only partially true or downright false.

10. You should always have one or more rough drafts

Perhaps you’ve heard it said that usually one’s first instinct is the most accurate one. This notion of not second guessing ourselves has been around for quite a long time. And recently, scientific study has weighed in on this matter.

In my opinion, this filters over into the practice of writing. While it is necessary to go over your work to correct errors and possibly make some wording and stylistic adjustments here and there, that by no means suggests an entire rewrite. And it certainly does not ensure that multiple revisions will be necessary.

9. Shakespeare wrote in proper English

There is no doubt that William Shakespeare was a brilliant writer with a masterful grasp of the English language. However, the man also “made up” more than 1,700 words. Some of these include the terms “arouse,” “fixture,” “majestic” and “negotiate.”

Imagine if we just randomly began to create our own words for letters, essays, research papers and more. Perhaps we’d even incorporate a bit of modern slang. This certainly wouldn’t be considered proper grammar or writing today and thus it wouldn’t have been in Shakespeare’s day either.

8. You must double space after a period

While in ages gone by when everything had to be hand-written, this was a non-issue. Only since the institution of typing machines (first typewriters and now computers) has this one even come into play.

When it comes to conventional typewriters, the sizes of the letters are slightly different. To compensate for this problem, it became common practice to add a second space after the period at the end of each sentence. But in this computer age, proportional font spacing has all but eliminated the need for double-spacing.

7. You should always use proper grammar

In most case, it is very important to use proper grammar. However, there are some instances in which a writer can bend or even break traditional grammatical rules for any number of purposes.

The famed twentieth-century poet E.E. Cummings provides a perfect example. In his work, Cummings frequently and intentionally used bad grammar to create a more dynamic effect while establishing his own personal style.

In other instances, writers sometimes use poor grammar in the speech of their characters. This is especially true when the author is trying to bring out cultural and ethnic traits such as the use of slang in an urban environment or the feeling of a Southern drawl.

6. You need a comma to separate every instance in a series

Separating small lists of items in a series does not necessarily require the use of a comma after each item. For example, according to many experts and style guides, the use of a comma before words like “and” or “or” to close out the series is actually quite redundant.

For instance, let’s take the list “red, white and blue.” Notice how there is no comma prior to the word “and.” The reasoning is that if we use a comma after the word “white” it essentially amounts to using the word “and” twice.

5. Paragraphs have to have more than one sentence

This is a long-held myth that can be easily disproved. All one has to do is look to the work of legendary author Charles Dickens. His famous novel entitled “A Tale of Two Cities” begins with a single paragraph that is also only one sentence long.

The truth is, as long as it meets the criteria to make a paragraph, there is no set number of sentences the writer must use. It can be as few or as many as her or she wants.

4. There is only one proper way to cite sources

While your teacher may have preferred the use of a particular style in his or her classes, there are actually several ways to cite sources in research papers and the like. Often this varies depending upon the discipline you are researching or studying.

A few of the more common style guides include MLA (Modern Language Association), APA (American Psychological Association), CMS (Chicago Manual of Style) and AP Style used by many journalistic outlets. There are several others out there as well.

3. Always use a comma after the greeting in a letter

While using a comma after statements like ”Dear Ted” or “Hello Maggie” at the start of a letter is generally correct and seen as good grammar, this is not always the case.

In instances in which you are writing a business letter, the comma should actually be replaced by a colon.

 Commas should be reserved for more informal communication.

When it comes to the use of email, it is generally accepted that either of these two forms of punctuation can be used to fit the bill.

2. You should not shift tenses

Sure, shifting tense for no real reason is poor grammar and makes for poor writing. However, there are some instances in which a shift in tense is appropriate and even required to make things work.

If the time frame of something taking place in your writing moves from past to present, you have to change the tense for both correctness and to avoid reader confusion. The following two sentences provide a simple example. “I was so afraid to get on that bicycle as a young child. Reflecting back on that point in my life, I think it was more about the possible embarrassment of falling rather than getting hurt.”

As you can see, the first sentence focuses on the past and uses the past tense while the second one is amount my reflections in the present.

1. You can’t use “and” to start a sentence

Those who use “and” to start off a sentence have long been ostracized by those entrusted with teaching us the English language. However, this isn’t a criticism that is based in the reality of proper grammar.

While the use of “and” as the first word of a sentence can come across as rather informal and has the potential to make your wording a bit choppy and awkward, it’s not technically wrong. In fact, some language experts suggest that it can actually work better in some case that using more traditional terms like “however,” “therefore” and “furthermore”

Finding out about fan fiction

Fan fiction

has been around for several years now. And while I had a basic idea of what the concept was all about, I never really bothered to look into it until recently. A friend of the family gave me a few more specific details of what is involved in this fan-driven form of literature.

Imagine reading your favorite science fiction book, or watching a classic super hero movie and having some actual control over the thoughts, actions and just about everything to do with the characters. This is the essence of fan fiction.

The control over one’s favorite characters combined with the ability to express one’s own creativity has made this form of writing a rapidly growing success.  Essentially, everything is possible!

Personally, as a fan of the television series “Revolution,” I am looking forward to checking out what people have written about this futuristic and somewhat post-apocalyptic show. Who knows, maybe someday I’ll even write some for myself.

Revolution show

Awaken Anew (a poem)

I’ve decided to share

a new poem I was recently inspired to write. I hope you enjoy it.

Awaken Anew

For more of my work, please feel free to check out my poetry books and other publications.

Three non-technical keys to writing your best poetry

What makes good poetry?

If someone was to ask this question to a crowd of people, that person would probably receive any number of different answers. But in my personal opinion as the author of poetry books, considering the fact that poetry is an art, who is to say what makes one piece good as opposed to another not? Like any art form, it is highly subjective.

writing poems

But with that being the case, I do believe that there are a few things any poet can do in order to make the best of their own work.

1. Be inspired -

If you don’t have some sort of inspiration behind your work, the result won’t be as satisfying as if you do. While in other forms of writing you can simply just jump into it, this is not the case with poetry.

2. Express emotion -

Letting your emotion pour out onto a page is very important in this particular form of literature.

3. Let if flow -

The flow of the words in your poetry is also very important. The more natural and compelling the flow of the words, the better your writing will end up.

Quality graphics (and other work) on the cheap

Sometimes you might just have a reason…

to need some sort of graphic design work but either don’t have the knowledge or time to complete the project yourself. And if you’re anything like this blog owner, you may not have the funds either.

One option is to hire someone who engages in what is known as “micro-jobbing.”

So what is micro-jobbing?

Actually it’s a very simple concept. People provide a service, such as graphic design, for a very small fee in order to complete a relatively quick or minimally time consuming job. Sometimes you can get things done for as little as $5!

Some other types of services include:

Search engine optimization

Photo editing

Writing

Video

Audio

One of the top sites for this type of business exchange is Fiverr.com.

Check out a few examples of some work I offer below:

graffitti message spot color in photo facebook cover photo animation

If you need something quickly and at an affordable price, this may just be your answer. Or, if you’ve got some extra time on your hands, you can possibly make a few extra bucks here and there by offering your skills in this capacity.

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