Your home for everything artistic

While some might think of black and white photography as something from an era of the past, there are many people who still work with it in today’s modern world. If you are one of those who may be wonder why that is, let me give you a few reasons.

1. The Artsy Factor

A black and white photo simply has a different and unique artistic quality than does a typical color picture.

2. B/W “Fixes” Many Problems

Have a person with different skin tones or blotchy patches? Black and white negates this. Did you mess up with your white balance and have orange tones in your shot? Black and white will eliminate this problem. There are several other issues that a black and white photo will resolve as well.

3. Details

Perhaps it’s the contrast in black and white photos but for some reason they tend to bring out more detail than you may get in color shots in some cases. This can be useful for close up shots and nature photos.

Look at this photograph of the Snake River by Ansel Adams:

Black and white may be old-school but it’s still a route I like to travel once in a while.

“Molly and her family lived on the seabed, off the coast of Florida in the sea. Molly loved to play fetch with her pet clam Cobalt. They always played fetch with a pearl Cobalt made. Playing fetch is Cobalt’s favorite game to play with others, especially with his favorite pearl. Till one day the pearl disappeared. Molly was sad that Cobalt’s pearl was gone and that they couldn’t play fetch anymore.”

– From Page 1 of a prospective children’s book. Image not part of the prospective work.

We’ve already seen how fashion and music have influenced each other over the last few decades. The line between the two expressions has frequently been blurred. Fashion is also frequently a form of “artistic” expression, in which the choice of clothes, accessories, haircuts, or tattoos is personal and objective, but which becomes a universal language.

In the case of Emo culture, the sharing of one’s own emotions, the most intimate, and often the most painful, serves as the foundation of personal expression.

Being Emo entails not only listening to a specific type of music, but also adopting looks that accurately define the emotion of the moment.

PUNK-ROCK AND EMO

The term Emocore was used to describe a musical subgenre that emerged in the United States around the turn of the 1970s and 1980s, and represented the culmination of the punk-rock trajectory that began in 1976.

This name was originally used to describe the music of Washington, DC and the bands associated with it, but it was later expanded to include other musical variations that followed. It appears that the use of the term “emo” was originally linked to the bands’ desire to “arouse emotions” in the audience during concerts.

Punk rock was initially nihilistic, boasting of having no meaning and no interest in society. The indifference was then transformed into a deep-seated anger that was expressed and transferred to the public through the power of music with more defined and political messages.

Emocore had a more private meaning, shifting from the social to the individual spheres, and despite the similarity in tone, emocore represented almost the exact opposite of what punk-rock wanted to be in 1976.

PHILOSOPHY

This modern youth subculture of gothic-punk matrix is distinguished by a nihilistic, and in some cases self-harming, philosophy of life. This is one aspect that has been heavily stigmatised by the mainstream media, which portrays emo as poor people who have committed suicide.

This peculiar feature, which distinguishes the Emo movement, gave the members of this world the appearance of “those who arm themselves.”

Those who express strong emotions and the “pain of living” do not fit in a society that wants us all to be beautiful and happy, consumers and superficial. In short, those who look beyond the surface can only be considered underdogs.

Most of the time, however, these are young teenagers looking for their own dimension and space, who, as the term “emo” suggests, are looking for emotions that express an increasingly common symptom of discomfort.

One of the recurring features is the frequent use of body mod, while a notable aspect is that those who belong to this modern subculture appear to take great care of their appearance, which is inspired by punk and Gothic, with dark style influences.

EMO PHILOSOPHY’S ORIGIN AND EVOLUTION

This modern youth subculture of gothic-punk matrix is distinguished by a nihilistic, and in some cases self-harming, philosophy of life. This is one aspect that has been heavily stigmatised by the mainstream media, which portrays emo as poor people who have committed suicide.

This peculiar feature, which distinguishes the Emo movement, gave the members of this world the appearance of “those who arm themselves.”

Those who express strong emotions and the “pain of living” do not fit in a society that wants us all to be beautiful and happy, consumers and superficial. In short, those who look beyond the surface can only be considered underdogs.

Most of the time, however, these are young teenagers looking for their own dimension and space, who, as the term “emo” suggests, are looking for emotions that express an increasingly common symptom of discomfort.

One of the recurring features is the frequent use of body mod, while a notable aspect is that those who belong to this modern subculture appear to take great care of their appearance, which is inspired by punk and Gothic, with dark style influences.

Look and fashion become communication vehicles, explicitly discussing the relationship between appearance and identity in order to transmit – particularly to adults – their own distance from dominant social roles, in a continuous definition and redefinition of one’s condition as future adults.

The “emo kids” can be considered “true emos.” These are young people who have made depression and emotions a way of life.

The “posers” are the first generation and refer to the original current of the 1980s, which emerged as a “alternative movement” to the subgenre of punk music. By recent developments in the phenomenon, they are considered “fundamentalists” and not “corrupt”: they listen only to music and do not follow fashion. The term poser was coined as a derogatory term for them; the “emo darks” are the more “fundamentalist” variant than the previous ones. They’ve developed new musical tastes and used to dress entirely in black or dark colours.

The most recent developments are “Scene queen” and “Scene king.” These people are considered web celebrities because they have at least one website with a large number of visitors and fans. It is a trend that goes beyond the way of dressing with a maniacal image in search of attention and celebrity.

THE SOUND

In the music industry, the term emo has grown far beyond its origins and now encompasses all bands inspired by hardrock punk.

There was “emocore” in the beginning, a style pioneered by Rites Of Spring and the Embraces of the Washington contingent in the late 1980s. This introduced a new melodic component into the sound, forming an innovative genre that was destined to gain popularity, particularly among the younger generation, from that point forward.

Furthermore, in the 1990s, this sound was heavily influenced by another musical subgenre, indie rock, which distinguishes the current emo from the previous one.

Other emo bands include Him, who play love metal, Panic At The Disco, and My Chemical Romance, whose lyrics are almost entirely about sadness and gloom. To add to this short list, we have Fall Out Boy, Finch, From Autumn To Ashes, From First to Last, The Juliana Theory, and others with their “emotional” hardcore that alternates silent and furious musical parts, relies on emotional songs that whisper and shout within the same song, and is not limited to the hardcore’s short/fast format.

One of the genre’s more recent pioneers was Lil Peep, the stage name of Gustav Elijah hr (Allentown, 1 November 1996 – Tucson, 15 November 2017), an American rapper, songwriter, and model. He is regarded as the forefather of the post-emo genre revival based on hip hop and rock music.

The media has labelled My Chemical Romance’s music as emo, pop punk, and post-hardcore. On their official website, the band describes their genre as “rock” and rejects the term “emo” to describe their style. They have, however, been heavily influenced by horror films and comics, and their music, lyrics, and images frequently incorporate elements from fantasy books, fiction, horror, and a certain theatricality.

If your looking to take your Emo style to the next level, head to The Armageddon to see what they have to offer.

The truth can’t always be seen with your eyes. 

The truth has been hidden from the watchful. 

The lies of life are everywhere, 

like how flies swarm to trash. 

For a young teen these false truths become truths.

Hyperealism

Guest post by Mariana Abeid-McDougall’s Services

If you love photography and portrait drawings, you will love hyperealistic portraits.

Using a variety of materials, including graphite pencils, coloured pencils, paint, and even silicone resin, hyperealistic artists create images that blur the line between reality and art. Often, portraits by these artists can be confused for photography.

Some examples of hyper-realistic portrait artists include Gottfried Helnwein, who often draws children as well as pop culture icons, Lee Price, who paints women and food, and Chuck Close, sometimes called the “grandaddy of hyper-realism.”

Guest post by Rachel Rabalais

Have you ever been stuck at the office or jogging in the park and wanted to put your music playlist on shuffle? Something relaxing but also motivating. Not having to stick with one genre of music. You should listen to 2Cellos, they have so many different genres of music (pop, rock, and classic) that everyone will appreciate. This type of contemporary music which is really art, is classic but also will make you excited to start your day! What are some songs they cover? They have played songs by: Michael Jackson, Bon Jovi, Survivor and even Pirates of the Caribbean. Who are they? 2Cellos was started by two very talented male cellists by the names of Luka Šulić and Stjepan Hauser. Luka and Stjepan are both Croatian Cellists. Croatia is a country near Central and Southeast Europe. Croatia is also a language similar to Bulgarian. The two Cellists are very similar in appearance and language, they made a plan to do something crazy and exciting when they met up in London in 2011 after not seeing each other in 10 years. They had already been thinking of collaborating in the past. They are very well known and have (5) albums out. They also have been seen on popular television series such as; The Bachelor and Glee. 2Cellos is a fascinating pair to check out, their music videos are jaw-dropping the way they can play the Cello and the dedication they have towards their music. You definitely need to check them out and you will not be disappointed!

Check out their full concert below cutesy of their official YouTube channel.

Ever wondered how people create those goofy like GIFs used in social posts and on websites? Well, it can be done a number of ways but here’s one that doesn’t require much skill or work. https://ezgif.com/

The tool lets you resize, crop, optimize, use videos and more. See screenshot below.

It took a long time after Fiver decided to change the seller rating process but I am glad to say that I’ve finally made it to a Level 2 Seller! For those of you who don’t know how big that can be, there are Four Levels for sellers on the freelance gig giant as seen here. They are based on selling seniority and reputation and go like this – New Seller, Level 1, Level 2, and Top Rated Seller. A Level 2 rating is the highest you can get without a manual review from the website’s team and having sold at least $20,000 in services. So basically, a Level 2 is pretty darn good.

If you’ve ever bought any on my gigs, I really appreciate your support and if you haven’t but might want to see what I do, please check out my profile.

New Camera Body

Or at least new to me that is. I love my Panasonic Lumix but as an older model it doesn’t do all that well on noise when I need to shoot at a high ISO in low light. I found a used Olympus ODM E-M10 after searching form something that would work. And as a Micro 3/4 camera, it takes my Olympus lens I already own! Here is a comparison shot between the two on the same settings (F4 with 128000 ISO). Lumix on the left and Olympus of the right. I thin I made a good call.

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