Your home for everything artistic

Archive for May, 2014

Color symbolism in art and literature

The use of color in creative ventures has long been a method through which artists, writers and various creative types have used as a method of symbolism. And while some color symbolism is fairly obvious and has become a standard in every day society,  other uses can be more ambiguous and even unique to a given work.

color

Here are some examples of what colors may represent in any given artwork.

The absolute basics:

Black –

In almost every case, black indicates the concepts of darkness, evil, corruption, death and many rather negative ideas.

White – 

Conversely, white is nearly always used to represent purity, light, life and all that is good.

Colors with several (sometimes conflicting) qualities:

Red –

We often think of red as the color of love or passion. However, it is also associated with evil or rage.

Blue –

The old term indicating that someone is “feeling blue” has been associated with depression and sadness. But, blue being the color of water, is also sometimes intended to symbolize life.

Green –

Green is commonly the color associated with, nature and natural beauty. However, people are also said to be “green” with envy and sometimes called green when they are inexperienced.

Yellow –

Cowardice and weakness have been connected to yellow. But then again, yellow is also a shade associated with happiness and enlightenment.

Gold –

When we think of gold, we make think of power and wealth. But at the same time, it can represent greed, a state of hardness or shallow materialism.

Interesting huh?

 

Common delusions about translation

Guest Post By Jessica Wright

Translation needs a lot of creativeness when adapting what it is said in one language to another. If you speak more than one language it doesn’t necessarily mean that you can translate. Also, the lack of creativity of machines makes them unable to be real translators.

Here are some common delusions concerning translation.

“I was raised bilingually, so that makes me a translator”

A common misconception is that people who are bilingual are commonly great translators. However, this is not always the case. There is more to translating than knowing two languages equally. In order to become a translator you should be able to convert one language into another in such a way that the meaning is kept and the translation reads like the original and its context. There is indeed a big difference between being able to use two languages, and being able to translate between then, keeping the meaning and the general feeling of the text.

“I speak a foreign language, so I can be a translator”

Again, knowing a language does not automatically make you a translator. Even though people might be fluent in a language and feel comfortable speaking it, spoken and written languages are slightly different.

“Modern translation tools are so advanced that they can replace human translators”

We all have experience with Google Translate. Such translation tools are only able to translate a sentence word for word without taking into consideration the context, and more importantly-the feeling that the sentence should bring. And since such tools cannot understand context, they cannot distinguish between different meanings of the same word. In addition, they simply translate the sentence using its original word order, which in another language might sound weird or can totally lose the meaning. This generally is the reason why such translation tools don’t have advantage over human translators who can identify the context and the desired feeling of the text, bringing nuances and vivid meaning into the translation. However, translation tools can be useful to find out what a text in another language is (roughly) about.

“Translation can’t be that difficult, there’s only one possible translation for every text”

Having met a large number of language agencies offering translation services in UK, I can assure translation isn’t an exact science: there never is just one correct answer. Translation depends on context, feeling, target audience, etc. All these details give specific nuances to the translation. This is the reason why it is wrong to believe that there might be only one translation to a text. Ask five different translators to translate the same sentence and chances are that you will get five different translations to the same text, which are all correct. The importance of which translation is more suitable for a given occasion comes from the context and the desired audience- some translations could be more appropriate for the context and the intended target audience than others (however the rest of the translations are still correct).

So, you’re not a rap fan?

“I don’t like rap.”

It’s a phrase I hear quite often, especially from members of an older generation. While I can understand ang appreciate that if, your reasoning is sound. For example, if you don’t like the stylistic elements and you’d rather tune in to some jazz, blues, rock or country. However, I can’t stand when anyone makes a blanket statement about ALL of one music genre or another.

That being the case, here are five rap/hip-hop songs I think might just surprise some of the naysayers.

Tag Cloud