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Posts tagged ‘literature’

The “rules” of poetry

When people first hear the word poetry…

beside the notion of eloquent language and the concept of emotional sensitivity coming to mind, they might often think about this form of literature as being filled with rules and structural regulations.

While classically poetry has had it’s share of rigidity and intense structure, this is not always necessarily the case.  For example, slam poetry would probably drive someone from the Renaissance era insane.

Personally, I believe that good poetry is not so much about structure and form as it is about emotion and the ability to convey a concept not easily stated in any other way. Hence the reason that I, and many others, do not always follow the so-called rules.

First and foremost, poetry is an art and as such should not be constrained. We all need to have our own rules to some extent.

My personal rules and guidelines

1. I either use rhyme or not. It seems clumsy and awkward to switch between the two in the same poem.

2. When I use rhyme, I tend to rhyme in a pattern of matching up either the first and third/second and fourth lines or a stanza of lines one and two then three and four.

3. I generally write 3-5 line stanzas

4. Modern free verse has always been a great stylistic friend

5. I rarely punctuate except for emphasis with a question mark or exclamation point or to separate items in a series with a comma

I figure hey, what the heck? After all, E.E. Cummings was known for his unorthodox and grammatically flexible style while the great William Shakespeare literally made up hundreds if not thousands of words.

images

Courtesy of Wikipedia

Bigfoot, literature and humor – the perfect combination

If you are anything like me, you appreciate good literature. However, you also enjoy a good laugh once in a while. The book “In Me Own Words” The Autobiography of Bigfoot,” readers get a little bit of the best from both worlds.

While the book is anything but grammatically correct, the errors are intentional and designed for the purpose of comedy and entertainment. Check it out today.

Bigfoot book

Color symbolism in art and literature

The use of color in creative ventures has long been a method through which artists, writers and various creative types have used as a method of symbolism. And while some color symbolism is fairly obvious and has become a standard in every day society,  other uses can be more ambiguous and even unique to a given work.

color

Here are some examples of what colors may represent in any given artwork.

The absolute basics:

Black –

In almost every case, black indicates the concepts of darkness, evil, corruption, death and many rather negative ideas.

White – 

Conversely, white is nearly always used to represent purity, light, life and all that is good.

Colors with several (sometimes conflicting) qualities:

Red –

We often think of red as the color of love or passion. However, it is also associated with evil or rage.

Blue –

The old term indicating that someone is “feeling blue” has been associated with depression and sadness. But, blue being the color of water, is also sometimes intended to symbolize life.

Green –

Green is commonly the color associated with, nature and natural beauty. However, people are also said to be “green” with envy and sometimes called green when they are inexperienced.

Yellow –

Cowardice and weakness have been connected to yellow. But then again, yellow is also a shade associated with happiness and enlightenment.

Gold –

When we think of gold, we make think of power and wealth. But at the same time, it can represent greed, a state of hardness or shallow materialism.

Interesting huh?

 

Challenge to all the smart literature fans out there

So, just for fun…

with a little bit of an incentive for participation, I thought that I would propose a challenge to the readers of this blog as well as all literature fans everywhere.

Whether you’re an avid reader or like to write or both, this might just be right up your alley.

Think of one book or literary work from any genre, perhaps your favorite book. It can be poetry, fantasy, sci-fi, horror, a play or really anything else you choose. Now, once you’ve made your pick, here’s your chance to let your creativity flow.

Summarize your pick in the comments section of this post. Sounds easy right, we’ll not so fast. The summary can only be five lines long! The more interesting and accurate the better. Do you think you can handle it?

stack of books

While this isn’t a contest per se, as an incentive we are offering:

For best comment (as chosen by me) – Free promotion on at least 10 different social media platforms, a free links to your blog from this one and one year of a free graphic ad on the right sidebar of this blog.

For the runner up –  Free promotion on at least 10 different social media platforms and Free promotion on at least 10 different social media platforms and a free link to your blog from this one.

For third place (up to 10 winners) – A free link to your blog from this one.

Only comments posted over the next 30 days will be counted and please be original.

SAMPLE: 

The book (and now movie)  “Divergent” – “Young woman in weird future leaves her family for exciting life, learns it’s hard, and ruins villain’s plan to destroy government.”

Come on now, show us what you’ve got!

 

 

 

 

Awaken Anew (a poem)

I’ve decided to share

a new poem I was recently inspired to write. I hope you enjoy it.

Awaken Anew

For more of my work, please feel free to check out my poetry books and other publications.

Three non-technical keys to writing your best poetry

What makes good poetry?

If someone was to ask this question to a crowd of people, that person would probably receive any number of different answers. But in my personal opinion as the author of poetry books, considering the fact that poetry is an art, who is to say what makes one piece good as opposed to another not? Like any art form, it is highly subjective.

writing poems

But with that being the case, I do believe that there are a few things any poet can do in order to make the best of their own work.

1. Be inspired –

If you don’t have some sort of inspiration behind your work, the result won’t be as satisfying as if you do. While in other forms of writing you can simply just jump into it, this is not the case with poetry.

2. Express emotion –

Letting your emotion pour out onto a page is very important in this particular form of literature.

3. Let if flow –

The flow of the words in your poetry is also very important. The more natural and compelling the flow of the words, the better your writing will end up.

How to overcome writer’s block

No matter what professional or recreational activities we may engage in, at some point, we’re all going to be off of our game. A surgeon may struggle with shaky hands, a public speaker may slip into a bit of a stutter, or any other number of samples can apply. But in many cases, these problems are more mental than they are physical.

One of the most notorious examples in the world of literature is that pesky little condition known as writers block.

writer's block

Photo courtesy of Marya Jan

First off, make no mistake, it happens to everyone.

But as I can suggest by personal experience, there is really only one reliable way to deal with it and overcome this problem – writing through it.

Whether you are a sports fan or not, the easiest way to explain what I mean is through the world or athletics. Let’s take baseball. Even the best and most productive hitters in the game fall into a slump from time to time. During those slumps a pitch that they might normally knock right out of the park might send them to the bench as a victim of a strikeout. And worse yet, it keeps happening over and over again. But how does the hitter finally break out of the slump? He keeps hacking away until he succeeds and gets back into his typical rhythm.

The same approach should and must be taken when you find yourself in a state of writer’s block.

Here are two practical ways to do so:

1. Write for the sake or writing during a case of block. Just keep going despite the quality. This is essentially exercise and nobody ever even has to see what you write.

2. Use the condition as inspiration. Yes, write something, anything, about writer’s block. A few yea’s back I had a poetry assignment I had to write for a class and just couldn’t get going. So, I decided to write the poem about the need to be inspired. In the end, I got an A.

In the end, when you take the time to work through the frustration, things will work out just fine.

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