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Posts tagged ‘symbolism’

The color green

Across various cultures, time frames, societies and groups, colors have always been known to hold certain connotations. Considering it is March and all, I thought I’d take a moment to delve into the symbolism associated with the color green.

Like many colors, if not even all of them, green can suggest concepts with both positive and negative connotations. Here are just a few I could think of right off the bat.

green

Positive

Green is often associated with nature or the environment. After all, don’t we frequently consider things green is they are deemed to be good for the Earth?

Green is frequently a color mentioned with the concept of luck. One simple and timely example is that of the Leprechaun.

Negative

Have you ever heard someone say the phase “green with envy?” I bet you have. And we all know that envy isn’t a flattering quality to have.

At times, when someone is young and inexperienced, he or she may be refereed to as green. For example, someone new to a business or job might fit the idea here.

I bet you might have been a bit green yourself when it comes to thinking about all the associations of such a simple color.

 

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Color symbolism in art and literature

The use of color in creative ventures has long been a method through which artists, writers and various creative types have used as a method of symbolism. And while some color symbolism is fairly obvious and has become a standard in every day society,  other uses can be more ambiguous and even unique to a given work.

color

Here are some examples of what colors may represent in any given artwork.

The absolute basics:

Black –

In almost every case, black indicates the concepts of darkness, evil, corruption, death and many rather negative ideas.

White – 

Conversely, white is nearly always used to represent purity, light, life and all that is good.

Colors with several (sometimes conflicting) qualities:

Red –

We often think of red as the color of love or passion. However, it is also associated with evil or rage.

Blue –

The old term indicating that someone is “feeling blue” has been associated with depression and sadness. But, blue being the color of water, is also sometimes intended to symbolize life.

Green –

Green is commonly the color associated with, nature and natural beauty. However, people are also said to be “green” with envy and sometimes called green when they are inexperienced.

Yellow –

Cowardice and weakness have been connected to yellow. But then again, yellow is also a shade associated with happiness and enlightenment.

Gold –

When we think of gold, we make think of power and wealth. But at the same time, it can represent greed, a state of hardness or shallow materialism.

Interesting huh?

 

Eternal Spring (A Poem)

While I love to use a bit of symbolism in my poetry and almost always want to allow the reader to interpret my writing how they see it, this one is a bit different. It is heavily metaphorical, while also holding some literal meaning and is really meant to mean one thing and one thing only. I also reference two English Renascence era poets in specific lines and phrases. If you’d like a bit of an explanation, please read the notes after the photo below.

Please enjoy.

Eternal Spring

—————————————————

With the winter

All foliage does fade

And decay under the weight

Of frigid air and show

——————————————————–

Everything hides in waiting

Under the soil of the earth

———————————————————

Then comes the spring

And all rises anew

———————————————————

In the grand scheme of the cosmos

The longest winter has seen its end

And the eternal spring has risen

Resurrecting all things to new life

———————————————————–

This eternal spring shall never fade

Even against winter’s bitter sting

As the warmth of the sun’s love

Has truly set all free

Courtesy of Free13k.com

Explanation (or at least partial clues) as mentioned above:

Stanza 1 – “Winter”, the fading and “decay” of foliage and the “weight of frigid air and snow” all have direct metaphorical meanings.

Stanza 2 – The phrase “in waiting” and “under the soil” are representative of a specific state of being.

Stanza 3 – “Spring” and the phrase “all rises anew” also have direct relation to a desired state of being.

Stanza 4 – Thegrand plan” and “the cosmos” refer to a specific entity. The “longest winter” further emphasizes the theme in stanza 1. “Resurrecting” has a fairly obvious connotation in my opinion and the phrase “new life” goes along with it.

Stanza 5 – The phrases “eternal spring” and “sun’s love” again refer to a specific entity. The “winter’s bitter sting” is a metaphor for the cause of the metaphor for winter.

The referencing of the eternal spring “shall never fade” is also a nod to Shakespeare’s Sonnet 18 and the aforementioned “sun’s love” also is a tribute to something in one of  John Donne’s works from his Corona.  Feel free to check them out.

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