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Posts tagged ‘tips’

Taking Photos Through Glass – Minimizing Reflection

Have you ever noticed a wonderful sight that would make for a cool photography while you where riding along in a car or standing in front of a pane of glass somewhere? If you answered yes, and I am pretty sure you probably did, I also bet that you are aware of the sometimes frustrating challenges that come with shooting photos through a glass surface.

Here are a few tips that you might find helpful.

1. Get as close to the glass as possible

The closer you put your camera or phone to the glass surface the better. If you can literally put it up against it that works best. This helps minimize reflection as that there is less of it to be captured by your device.

2. Avoid taking the shot head on

If you take a photo head on, you might catch a lot of glare or the unwanted parts of a reflection. Sometimes stepping off sideways or angling you shot just a little can really work out well for you.

3. Wait for the right moment

If you are in a vehicle, you should probably wait until you get to a location that has less direct sunlight as that it can also mess with the outcome of the shot with reflective glare. The less sun or direct light, the less glare and thus the less reflective.

4. Use a lens hood

If you are using a traditional camera, opt for a lens hood. If you can find one that is rubber, it will allow for more flexibility to do the things mentioned in step 1.

5. Watch out for scratches

It is often the situation that the glass you want to photography through might have scratches or dirt marks or streaks. The bets thing to do to work around this is to try to find the least troubled area or to shoot items that will allow those spots to blend in with the image to some point.

 

This first shot is a good example from Wikimedia Commons that show the problems with reflection.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sliding_door

SKTungwoodsOwn work

640px-HK_TST_Kln_Park_Drive_Yue_Hwa_Int_Building_自動門_Showa_automatic_door

This second one was shot through glass at a public aquarium in my home town of Pittsburgh. The reflective qualities and scratches/dirt on the surface have been eliminated extensively using the skills and techniques listed.

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Writing for your blog – keep it simple

As any of my long-time readers probably know by now, as well as anyone who has run a blog for themselves has likely found out, not all methods of writing are created equal or appropriate for any situation.

Blog writing is no exception and thus  is an animal unto itself.

blog writers

Here are some tips

Blogs tend to be either informative or entertaining:

As such, chances are that your readers/viewers don’t want a challenging read. They prefer to pick up something new quickly and with relative ease.

Don’t write like an academic:

Using an old-school example, print newspapers often feature content geared toward about a 4th grade reading level. Even the elite papers rarely go beyond that of the standard 7th grader. While you don’t want to insult your readers with over-simplistic content, there is no need to write the next War and Peace or  The Odyssey. If a person is looking for something like that, they won’t be coming to a blog to find it.

Avoid being technical:

No, I don’t mean writing about the tech industry. What I mean is that when possible, blog writers should avoid using jargon or terminology related to a specific industry or field. These types of terms and phrases can make for a more difficult read and also turn off anybody who may just be starting to learn about your topic.

Brevity and flow:

With any online resource, keeping your content flowing well and to the point is a major asset for any of your readers. In today’s world, people want quality information in a quick and concise manner.

Last but not least K.I.S.S.:

The acronym K.I.S.S. can  be used as either (Keep It Short and Sweet) or (Keep It Simple Stupid). Both phases are intend to mean that any person trying to convey a message, and in our case blog writers, would be best served by avoiding going overboard with details and keeping the content easy to follow and understand.

 

Why every writer needs an editor

From the least experienced writing novice to the author with several books under his or her belt, everyone needs an editor. To some, this may seem obvious but to many the reaction may be quite different.

First off, what I’m talking about here is not an editor in terms of an intermediary between a publisher and a writer but more of a proof reader if you will.

Simply put, proof reading your own work will only get you so far.

In order to help to ensure your manuscript is in tip top shape, you should:

1. Have others review your work for mistakes

– From typos to incorrect grammar and phrasing, getting someone else to review your work can be crucial. Of course, the person doing so should have a good grasp on spelling and grammar.

2. Realize the weakness in our own perception

– Writers often miss their own mistakes by projecting their expectations onto the page while reading their work. We tend read things as we intended them to be rather than as they actually appear, leaving us vulnerable to missing our own errors.

Taking these basic precautions can work wonders for the quality of your final manuscript whether you are Joe Blow the aspiring novelist or have produced worldwide best sellers.

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