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Archive for the ‘photography’ Category

Eclectic Artist Jessi Pettit

Many artists tend to specialize in one medium, and sometimes even a subgroup within that. Jessi Pettit is not one of those artists. You can see her work under the name CLR SPLSH Designs which includes some unique abstract photography along with colorful and vibrant painted works.

Here are some samples of her work:

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Make or Break Use of Angles in Photos

When people talk about the technical side of photography, it is easy to get lost in all the math and science while forgetting some of the more basic parts. One of these is the effective usage of angles.

Take the two photos below. The first does show a nice flowering plant, the details are all there but so is something a little less pleasant. Check out the dirty black trash bag in the corner. the seconds is of the same plant at a slightly different angle with similar coloration and clarity but no ugly distraction. The third and fourth photos show something similar too.

So the point is, when you’re working on your exposure meter setting, adjusting aperture and shutter speed, selecting the appropriate ISO… don’t forget to use a nice and effective choice of angles.

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Hey Photographers – Don’t Fret Minor Exposure Issues in Photos

Form time to time, most of us photography enthusiasts mess  up a shot with high or low exposure. Our first instinct might be “oh, crap!” but once you step away from the moment for a bit, you could realize that a tiny bit of “incorrect” exposure isn’t always a bad thing.

See the charts below. They show a fairly significant swing in a typical meter. But, let’s suppose your shots hit less that 1 on either side, or even just the first dot. You have two options:

  1. Easily adjust in basically any editing program.
  2. Go with it because it might just produce a cool shot.

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The photo on the right-hand side is one I took at Station Square in Pittsburgh but I used editing software to make the other two so as to give examples of extremely over and under exposed shots.

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Here are a few shots people just went with or even did on purpose:

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Silly Photographer, Lights Are For Inside

Disclaimer: This post is not intended to offend it was just a catchy title bases on a slogan from Trix cereal that was part of many of childhoods.

Now with that said…

One thing that always dumbfounds me is when people make things harder than they have to be. We see this in all walks of life and across ages and cultures. As a person who works with portrait and model photography, I’ve noticed this when is comes to outside shooting sessions.

I have noticed fellow shooters lugging around all sort of contraptions from soft boxes to reflectors and everything in between for a shoot in the local park, at a pool or whatever setting it may be. The problem it, it’s not necessary and in some cases might even be a negative.

Simply put, NOTHING, and I mean nothing, beats working with natural light, especially during the “golden hour” period. It gives off a glow that just can’t be replicated with strobe units and reflecting devices. Basically, because it looks -natural.

No disrespect to people who do use studio fixtures outdoors. This is my opinion and this is art. Far be it for me to ever say anyone’s art is “wrong” in any way. Do what you do and if you are satisfied, fine.

But I  have run into several shooters who instantly get defensive or cop an attitude about it. Some would state that people only prefer natural light because they don’t know what they are doing with studio gear. My response would be that perhaps those who want studio fixtures in outdoor shots don’t know how to use natural light. In fact, I would suggest that it’s harder to work with what is available rather than having something at your hands to manipulate things.

If you shoot natural light (whether or not you do studio work too) and would like to join a group that uses this method, check out Natural Light Photographers International.

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Daydreaming in Kyoto By Dan Brook

To say Dan Brook enjoys art would be understating things to an extreme degree. While he works primarily as a political science professor in California, he also has engaged in a series of projects doing everything from photography to writing literature.

One of his really unique writings is a publication entitled “Daydreaming in Kyoto”  which is mentioned on his Smashwords page as showing “this magical city through evocative and provocative haiku and photographs.”

Check it out when you have a chance.

Daydreaming in Kyoto

 

 

Rocking Selfies

While the majority of those who take and upload “selfies” are not really doing so with any artistic intent, or are not having much success in doing so, it is not only possible to create artsy selfies but some have even made it a craft of sorts.

So, how can you rock the selfie? Here are some tips and samples.

1. Make sure the background isn’t a distraction. A solid color wall or distant nature setting would be much better than a messy bedroom.

Too busy:

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No distraction issues:

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2. Have as much light as possibly without washing out the shot. An overexposed pic or one that is so dark you can’t see anything is worse than no pic at all.

Overexposed:

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Better:

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3. Use a flattering angle. This is usually good for girls when they shoot the shot from somewhere overhead. Some positions however, can make you look wider or older.

Awkward position:

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Nice position setup:

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Happy photoing.

 

Cell Phone Photography IS NOT Photography But…

There have been a lot of posts out there including on this blog that say that cell phone photography cannot and won’t ever be able to, match the actual stuff done with real cameras. That being said, it can still be its own art. One example of such is a young lady I came across a couple of weeks ago who was featured at an arts market.  Her shots where colorful, detailed and just basically well done. I was a bit surprised to learn that every one of them was shot on her phone.

The key however was that it was not just the phone but also a series of attachments she made use of, including a special lens, to make her picture content so appealing.

So the point here is, while cell pics will not ever match those of a DSLR, with the right equipment and artist, they can get pretty close.

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