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Archive for the ‘photography’ Category

Spot Color app? Why not

With the exception of some rather snarky photography purists, many people like the idea of spot color photographs. And while there are many ways to get this done, some either involve expensive software or a level of expertise that takes a long time to attain. However, there is a simple and decent option for anyone that owns an Android smart phone or device.

The Color Touch application is free and allows easy adjustment.

Here is a promo sample from the app’s page.

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Making A Small Photo Studio For Yourself

Unless photography is our full-time occupation, and even if it is, many of us cannot afford to own a studio space. Sure, we can rent as needed. But if you have the space and aren’t opposed to having clients come to your home, you can easily set up a nice, professional studio without paying a bundle.

Here’s the basics of what you need:

1. Backdrops

You can either order some or make your own. I would suggest getting or designing at least 3, a black, a grey or white and one molted color blue or grey.

2. Lights

If you get steady lights it will be cheaper and you won’t need any triggers or sync tools. If you want to go a little more expensive, you can get strobe units for a reasonable price so long as you aren’t looking for the big brands.

3. Umbrellas

These are more affordable than soft boxes and basically do the same thing. They also come with some lighting units as part of the deal.

4. Accessories

You can check out my upcoming book on how to make your own reflectors, diffusers, product setup and more. I’ll be sure to let you know when it is out.

 

The Universal Gobo – Unlimited Options for Gobo Photos

As you probably realize by now, I enjoy being artistic with my photos. This being the case, one of the tools I find interesting is what are commonly referred to as gobos. I mentioned these in another post as any material that is placed in between the light and the subject to make a pattern out of shadows.

The biggest problem with today’s gobos are that they are big, heavy and tend to allow for just a single pattern making them inconvenient and costly. I recently invented what I call my “Universal Gobo” that solves ever one of these problems.

You can buy our Do It Yourself guide for just $3.00 and the materials should cost you less than $20. This is a lot nicer than paying around $20 each for those available in stores and over the web.

Agency Models, Do You Work With Them?

There are typically two types of people two model, those who do it on a freelance or independent basis and those who are represented by some sort of agency.

When it comes to a photographer choosing who to work with, this can make a massive difference.

My preference, having worked with both, is to go with the freelancers as much as possible. Here’s why:

1. Less hoops to jump through for booking

2. You’re going to find more variety in look and style

3. More options for being creative in you work

4. Less overall red tape

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Eclectic Artist Jessi Pettit

Many artists tend to specialize in one medium, and sometimes even a subgroup within that. Jessi Pettit is not one of those artists. You can see her work under the name CLR SPLSH Designs which includes some unique abstract photography along with colorful and vibrant painted works.

Here are some samples of her work:

Make or Break Use of Angles in Photos

When people talk about the technical side of photography, it is easy to get lost in all the math and science while forgetting some of the more basic parts. One of these is the effective usage of angles.

Take the two photos below. The first does show a nice flowering plant, the details are all there but so is something a little less pleasant. Check out the dirty black trash bag in the corner. the seconds is of the same plant at a slightly different angle with similar coloration and clarity but no ugly distraction. The third and fourth photos show something similar too.

So the point is, when you’re working on your exposure meter setting, adjusting aperture and shutter speed, selecting the appropriate ISO… don’t forget to use a nice and effective choice of angles.

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Hey Photographers – Don’t Fret Minor Exposure Issues in Photos

Form time to time, most of us photography enthusiasts mess  up a shot with high or low exposure. Our first instinct might be “oh, crap!” but once you step away from the moment for a bit, you could realize that a tiny bit of “incorrect” exposure isn’t always a bad thing.

See the charts below. They show a fairly significant swing in a typical meter. But, let’s suppose your shots hit less that 1 on either side, or even just the first dot. You have two options:

  1. Easily adjust in basically any editing program.
  2. Go with it because it might just produce a cool shot.

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The photo on the right-hand side is one I took at Station Square in Pittsburgh but I used editing software to make the other two so as to give examples of extremely over and under exposed shots.

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Here are a few shots people just went with or even did on purpose:

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