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Archive for the ‘photography’ Category

The Photography of Meg Spotts

Over the course of the years working in the field of photography, I have met a lot of talented people who share the love of the art. One such person is my very good friend Meg Spotts. And as such, I’d like to share a couple of her shots with you on this blog. Please check them out below:


This is a beautiful shot of the full moon over the Western Pennsylvania sky against the backdrop of a pitch black night.


This closeup of a stunning rose with water droplets upon the petals really draws in the viewer.

You can check out more of Meg’s work here.

Vintage Photography / Videography Collection Contest (Results)

Congratulations to Julie Ann, the winner of the Vintage Photography / Videography Collection Contest! Just in case you are wondering, the correct answers are below.


TOP SHELF – Wein WP5008 Flash Meter (Germany), Hanimex 49mm Skylight Polarizing Lens Filter (Japan) and Tiffin 49mm Lens Filter (USA)
SECOND SHELF – Kodak Brownie 8 Movie Camera (USA) and External Flash (Manufacturer unknown)
THIRD SHELF – 1920’s era Kodak folding camera (USA) and AFGA Insta Folding Camera

Randy Johnson – Baseball Legend and Fantastic Photographer

For those of you who follow the world of sports, and particularly baseball. You probably know Randy Jackson, AKA “the Big Unit” as a great pitcher with intimidating speed and a Hall of Fame career. But, what you might not know is that he is also a talented photographer.

Randy Johnson

He studied photography in college before dominating the major leagues for years. And since his retirement, he’s been focusing on this, his other passion. From metal concert photos to fast cars to landscapes and still life work, Randy has created some impressive art.

Randy Johnson shooting

Check out his official website for yourself.

5 Alternatives to Using Photoshop

It is not often that a creative photographer takes a shot that upon review on his or her computer couldn’t benefit from some level of editing. And as most photography buffs know, Adobe Photoshop is the industry standard. And while it is a great tool, it can also be quite expensive and take up a lot of space on your PC or laptop. That being the case, I wanted to leave the photogs out there with a few alternative options.


Pros: Feature rich and free

Cons: Requires download and takes some time to learn


Perfect Photo Suite

Pros: High quality tools and very professional feel

Cons: Only one on the list that isn’t free, steep learning curve

Perfect Photo Suite

Pixlr Editor

Pros: Can use it from the web and is rather similar to Photoshop in look and feel

Cons: Tools are limited, especially for batch work



Pros: Very easy to use

Cons: Light on features


Photoshop Express (App)

Pros: Great for on the go editing

Cons: Limited features

Photoshop Express


Vintage Photography / Videography Collection Contest

I recently completed my mini display of vintage photography and videography equipment. And having done so, I thought that this might be a good opportunity to have a little fun on this blog. So, I am officially announcing contest.

Here’s how it will work.

To enter, simply add a comment with your best guesses as to what each of the items are on each shelf. The guesses that come the closest will be ruled he winner. It’s as simple as that. In the event of a tie, additional consideration will be given to any person who also clicks “Like” on the post or shares it on social media.

What’s the prize?

Winner gets their choice of:

1 year of a free add on this blog.

A free lifetime membership to Image Aids – a video blog with tutorials on everything media and creativity related.

Any two services from my offerings at which can be found here.

Winner will be chosen on October 20 and announced on October 21, 2015.

Good luck and have fun!


Image Aids Tutorial Resource to Launch Live Video Chat Classes Soon

A while ago, Three Rivers Creative Arts introduced a new and innovative venture called Image Aids. This site was designed specifically to help photographic and other art enthusiasts to develop their craft through video tutorials on Photoshop, editing techniques, DIY projects, working with online video and audio along with so much more.

We are excited to announce that Image Aids will be expanding its horizons to what we will be calling the Image Aids Academy. The IAA will offer the ability for those interested in the visual and digital arts the ability to engage in personalized and custom-designed one-on-one live video chat classes!

Why pay hundreds or even thousands of dollars for a seminar, workshop or class at your local college only to be bombarded with a lot of full and technical jargon you really don’t need to be dealing with? Why not get right to the point in simple, plain English instead for a fraction of the cost?

join ia

IAA classes will start at just $50.00 for a 30-60 minute custom session focusing on only what you want and need to learn. Upon completion of the class, you will be given a certificate recognizing this.

Rest assured, the original Image Aids site which you can now preview a bit at Join Image Aids, will remain active with an ever increasing number of tutorial videos accessible at a one-time cost of just $10.00.

More details coming soon.


Making skin tones pop in your photography work

Whether you are a notice shutterbug or an experienced photographer, you have probably noticed that sometimes it can be a bit difficult to get the skin tone and coloration of a subject just right. This can often be the case with those who have a naturally fair skin tone. So, how do you handle making the skin color “pop” if you will? Well, here are three simple and highly effective tips that can make a major impact on any images you take.


1. Bump up the saturation

Find the saturation tool on your photo editor and slowly move the slider or number higher. Be careful not to go too far because the image can start to look unnatural.

2. Burn the dodge/burn tool

To darken light skin a bit, use the burn option starting out on a fairly low opacity, maybe 25% or so. You can increase the number if needed.

3. Add a warming filter

Adding a warming (probably orange-ish) style filter can add that sort of sun kissed vibe to a subject’s skin.

Bonus idea 

Using your program’s exposure tools, if there is an option to do so, increase the Gamma Correction slightly.

Taking one or more of these steps can really make a big difference in the quality of your photography.

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